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Eye health, contact lens, glasses and interesting vision-related tips from Dr. Jason Morris (Vision Source London | OPTOMETRY and Eye Wear Sudio, London Ontario Canada) www.studioeyecare.com
  1. Aug 2017 | There is a make-up trend that giving me business... in a bad way.  The popular look to paint lid margins is giving young women sore, irritated eyes and eye lids.  In the image below you can see the trend to paint lid margin (the strip of lid tissue between the lashes and the eye ball).  The problem is that there are openings to small glands (meibomian) on this strip that become clogged with makeup causing lid inflammation (sore), stys (infections) and irritated eyes (dry eye).  I know that an old Optometrist is not going to change teenagers' make-up styles!... but just be aware to [1] not use if you can [2] try to make sure that this area is cleaned properly after use [3] see an Optometrist if you have any of the symptoms listed above asap!      Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com


  2. July 2017 |  Re-posted information > credit to author below   Dr.j   StudioEyeCare.com

    Getting an Eye Tattoo Can Blind You

    You may have heard about a new frontier in tattooing: eyeball tattoos. A quick internet search will turn up dozens of photos (some real, some fake) of people with black, blue or multi-colored eyes. But just because some people have gotten away with it, don’t assume it’s safe—or a good idea. Your ophthalmologist says the risks aren’t worth it.

    Paul Freund, MD, and Mark Greve, MD, from the University of Alberta in Canada recently reported on a tragic case. A 24-year-old man underwent an eyeball tattoo procedure and experienced a sudden, painful loss of vision while the tattoo artist was injecting ink into the first eye.

    For eye tattoos, the tattooist injects ink just under the surface of the conjunctiva, so it colors the sclera – the white part of the eye. In this case, the ink had been injected too deep, into the vitreous humor in the middle of the eye.

    The patient sought treatment three days after the tattoo procedure. Drs. Freund and Greve removed the vitreous and the lens of the eye. The lens had been damaged by the needle during the tattoo procedure. The doctors discovered that the mixture of vitreous and tattoo ink was contaminated with bacteria. Two surgeries and multiple procedures to deliver antibiotics were done to try to control the infection and complications from the tattoo procedure.

    Eventually, the entire eye had to be removed because the young man was in so much pain. After the eye was removed, the retina and inside of the eye were found to be stained with ink. There was also cell loss on the corneal epithelium—which keeps the cornea healthy. Even if the eye had been saved, the patient would have had serious vision problems.

    Eyeball tattoos have serious risks and have not been medically or scientifically studied. Because they are not a traditional part of tattooing, artists who are doing eyeball tattoos may not be properly trained. Risks of eyeball tattoos include:

    Decreased vision or complete blindness
    Infection from the injection or ink
    Potential loss of the eye
    Sensitivity to light
    Feeling like something is in your eye


    Written by: Dan Gudgel
    Reviewed by: Paul R Freund, MD
  3. July 2017 | My daughter had a recent visit to the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto and found this interesting trivia for me...  The first sunglasses / snow goggles to protect eyes from damaging UV rays from the sun came from Canadian Inuit...  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_goggles    Happy 150 Canada   Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com

  4. July 2017 | In honor of U2 playing in Dublin this weekend I am pasting great 2015 information from the American Academy of Ophthalmology...  (Although in Canada Optometrists treat glaucoma too!)

    4 Things You can Learn About Glaucoma from Bono
    Written by: Linda Apeles
     
     Jan. 09, 2015
    One of the biggest glaucoma-related news stories of 2014 was Bono's revelation that he has the condition. While his comments about it have been brief, there are important tips the public can learn about glaucoma following the rockstar's announcement.

    1. Having glaucoma doesn't mean you have to go blind.

    When Bono announced he had glaucoma, he revealed that he has had the condition for many years. He serves as a great example of how many people with glaucoma can keep their sight and still lead very active lives if treated early enough. In fact, the probability of blindness due to glaucoma has decreased by nearly half since 1980. Researchers believe that advances in diagnosis and therapy are likely causes for the decrease.

    2. Glaucoma treatments work!

    It's no wonder the public never suspected that Bono had an eye disease – that's how effective glaucoma treatments, such as medicated eye drops and minimally invasive surgery, can be. "I have good treatments and I am going to be fine," Bono said at the time of the announcement.

    3. The earlier you get diagnosed, the better.

    The key to preventing vision loss from glaucoma is early diagnosis. While the details of his treatment have not been shared with the public, 54 year-old Bono said he has had the disease for over 20 years, so it's likely he was diagnosed at an early stage. Blindness from glaucoma can often be prevented with early treatment.

    4. Glaucoma may have no obvious symptoms in its early stages.

    As you get older, it is especially important to have regular medical eye exams. The only sure way to diagnose glaucoma is with a complete eye exam. A screening that only checks eye pressure is not enough to find glaucoma. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that all adults (even if they have no signs of symptoms of eye problems) get a baseline eye examination at least by age 40, the time when early signs of disease or changes in vision may occur. A baseline exam can help identify signs of eye disease at an early stage when many treatments can have the greatest impact on preserving vision. Of course, if you have any problems with your vision or eye comfort before age 40, don't wait; make an appointment with an ophthalmologist right away.


  5. June 15 - 17  |  I learned something today...  "Eyedrops get rid of bloodshot eyes but they can also be dangerous if your kid decides to squirt some in their mouth. 'Eyedrops that contain imidazoline decongestants such as naphazoline, tetrahydrozoline, or oxymetazoline are dangerous when ingested, even in small quantities like 1-2 tablespoons,' says Gwenn Christianson, RN at the Indiana Poison Center at IU Health. They can sedate children, and interfere with breathing. "

    Credit goes to: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/medical/warning-these-16-everyday-things-pose-huge-health-risks/ss-BBCEPFO?ocid=spartandhp#image=14

    Dr.j   www.studioeyecare.com

  6. May 2017 | As Summer fast approaches it has me thinking about new sunglasses.  Everyone knows that protecting eyes from the harmful rays of the sun with good sunglasses is just as important as protecting your skin with good sunscreen.  However, did you know that sunglasses also protect  delicate eyelid tissue from UV?    Our eye lids are a common place for skin cancer because we never put sunscreen close to our eyes.   Wear sunglasses this summer to protect both your eye and lids!
    Dr j    StudioEyeCare.com

  7. Feb 27, 2017  |  Great question from a young patient last week... "Why do I see spots after a bright light?"   To understand why, lets first talk about how the eye works.   When any light hits the back of the eye (retina) a chemical reaction occurs that converts the light energy into electrical/nerve energy that goes to the brain.  This reaction takes fuel that is constantly being produced by the eye and then used up - over and over again.   Under normal circumstances the fuel's speed-of-creation can keep up with the fuel's speed-of-use.  However, when the eye is presented with intense brightness like a camera flash (or eye exam!), the fuel is used up much faster than production.   Because there is no/low fuel after the flash, this flashed zone of the retina appears dark because there is no creation of the electrical/nervous energy until the fuel regenerates.    dr.j     Studioeyecare.com


  8. Feb 6, 2017 | With the explosion in the use of eyelash extension, there has certainly been associated issues coming through our clinic door.  #1 is ocular surface irritation [likely] from adhesives.  Please come in for assessment if your eyes have not felt 'right' since extensions.  Here is a good article from the Canadian Assoc of Optometrists... https://opto.ca/health-library/eyelash-extensions   Dr. j  Studioeyecare.com


  9. Jan 12 - 17 |  Why might glasses with the same prescription feel very different?   This week a new patient brought in two pairs of reading glasses made from the same 2015 prescription.  Pair #1 was made by a local Optician and pair #2 was ordered online.   The patient loved pair #1 and hated pair #2... she was convinced that the online folks had messed up the prescription because pair #2's lenses were thicker and she found that their distortion was intolerable.  When I checked the prescription of both pairs, they were identical.... So why would the 'feel' of the glasses be so different?    The answer is in the curves of the lenses.   A lens is like a math equation e.g.  If a lens prescription is +5.00...  there are different ways to fabricate that prescription just like there are different math equations that can add to +5.00...  1+4=5  and 2+3=5 and 5+0=5.    Our patient's problem was that pair#1 was fabricated with one lens equation and pair#2 was created with a completely different curve.  Questions about glasses?   We can help!   Studioeyecare.com   Dr.j


    Lens Distortion

  10. Nov 23, 2016  |  I had a great question from a patient this week "I used to tint the lenses in my old glasses to be my prescription sunglasses... can I still do that?"    I have been practicing for over 20 years and tinting old lenses was a very common thing... so what changed as tinting is rarely done these days!?   The answer is two parts: lens materials and coatings.   #1 spectacle lenses are more-and-more being made from materials that just do not tint well e.g. poly-carbonate or hi-index plastics  #2 the increased prevalence of anti-reflective coatings and tough anti-scratch coatings.  These coatings harden the lens surface and make it impenetrable to tints.   To tint a lens these days, the tints are applied prior to these coatings being applied.   Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com

Dr Morris' Vision Blog

  • Eye Make-Up Trend and Stys
    Aug 2017 | There is a make-up trend that giving me business... in a bad way.  The popular look to paint lid margins is giving young women sore, irritated eyes and eye lids.  In the image below you can see the trend to paint lid margin (the strip of lid tissue between the lashes and the eye ball).  The problem is that there are openings to small glands (meibomian) on this strip that become clogged with makeup causing lid inflammation (sore), stys (infections) and irritated eyes (dry eye).  I know that an old Optometrist is not going to change teenagers' make-up styles!... but just be aware to [1] not use if you can [2] try to make sure that this area is cleaned properly after use [3] see an Optometrist if you have any of the symptoms listed above asap!      Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com


  • Blinding Eye Tattoos
    July 2017 |  Re-posted information > credit to author below   Dr.j   StudioEyeCare.com

    Getting an Eye Tattoo Can Blind You

    You may have heard about a new frontier in tattooing: eyeball tattoos. A quick internet search will turn up dozens of photos (some real, some fake) of people with black, blue or multi-colored eyes. But just because some people have gotten away with it, don’t assume it’s safe—or a good idea. Your ophthalmologist says the risks aren’t worth it.

    Paul Freund, MD, and Mark Greve, MD, from the University of Alberta in Canada recently reported on a tragic case. A 24-year-old man underwent an eyeball tattoo procedure and experienced a sudden, painful loss of vision while the tattoo artist was injecting ink into the first eye.

    For eye tattoos, the tattooist injects ink just under the surface of the conjunctiva, so it colors the sclera – the white part of the eye. In this case, the ink had been injected too deep, into the vitreous humor in the middle of the eye.

    The patient sought treatment three days after the tattoo procedure. Drs. Freund and Greve removed the vitreous and the lens of the eye. The lens had been damaged by the needle during the tattoo procedure. The doctors discovered that the mixture of vitreous and tattoo ink was contaminated with bacteria. Two surgeries and multiple procedures to deliver antibiotics were done to try to control the infection and complications from the tattoo procedure.

    Eventually, the entire eye had to be removed because the young man was in so much pain. After the eye was removed, the retina and inside of the eye were found to be stained with ink. There was also cell loss on the corneal epithelium—which keeps the cornea healthy. Even if the eye had been saved, the patient would have had serious vision problems.

    Eyeball tattoos have serious risks and have not been medically or scientifically studied. Because they are not a traditional part of tattooing, artists who are doing eyeball tattoos may not be properly trained. Risks of eyeball tattoos include:

    Decreased vision or complete blindness
    Infection from the injection or ink
    Potential loss of the eye
    Sensitivity to light
    Feeling like something is in your eye


    Written by: Dan Gudgel
    Reviewed by: Paul R Freund, MD
  • First Sunglasses from Canada?
    July 2017 | My daughter had a recent visit to the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto and found this interesting trivia for me...  The first sunglasses / snow goggles to protect eyes from damaging UV rays from the sun came from Canadian Inuit...  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_goggles    Happy 150 Canada   Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com

  • U2's Bono and Glaucoma
    July 2017 | In honor of U2 playing in Dublin this weekend I am pasting great 2015 information from the American Academy of Ophthalmology...  (Although in Canada Optometrists treat glaucoma too!)

    4 Things You can Learn About Glaucoma from Bono
    Written by: Linda Apeles
     
     Jan. 09, 2015
    One of the biggest glaucoma-related news stories of 2014 was Bono's revelation that he has the condition. While his comments about it have been brief, there are important tips the public can learn about glaucoma following the rockstar's announcement.

    1. Having glaucoma doesn't mean you have to go blind.

    When Bono announced he had glaucoma, he revealed that he has had the condition for many years. He serves as a great example of how many people with glaucoma can keep their sight and still lead very active lives if treated early enough. In fact, the probability of blindness due to glaucoma has decreased by nearly half since 1980. Researchers believe that advances in diagnosis and therapy are likely causes for the decrease.

    2. Glaucoma treatments work!

    It's no wonder the public never suspected that Bono had an eye disease – that's how effective glaucoma treatments, such as medicated eye drops and minimally invasive surgery, can be. "I have good treatments and I am going to be fine," Bono said at the time of the announcement.

    3. The earlier you get diagnosed, the better.

    The key to preventing vision loss from glaucoma is early diagnosis. While the details of his treatment have not been shared with the public, 54 year-old Bono said he has had the disease for over 20 years, so it's likely he was diagnosed at an early stage. Blindness from glaucoma can often be prevented with early treatment.

    4. Glaucoma may have no obvious symptoms in its early stages.

    As you get older, it is especially important to have regular medical eye exams. The only sure way to diagnose glaucoma is with a complete eye exam. A screening that only checks eye pressure is not enough to find glaucoma. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that all adults (even if they have no signs of symptoms of eye problems) get a baseline eye examination at least by age 40, the time when early signs of disease or changes in vision may occur. A baseline exam can help identify signs of eye disease at an early stage when many treatments can have the greatest impact on preserving vision. Of course, if you have any problems with your vision or eye comfort before age 40, don't wait; make an appointment with an ophthalmologist right away.