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Dr. Shaffin Gulamhusein or “Shaff” as he’s known to his patients has been practicing optometry in London, Ontario since 2001. He graduated with Bachelor of Science degree in Human Biology from the University of Toronto in 1996 and received his Doctor of Optometry from The New England College of Optometry, Boston Massachusetts in 2000. As part of his extensive clinical training, he spent time at Aran Eye Associates Ophthalmology Group in Miami, Florida and The Brooke Army Medical Centre in San Antonio, Texas. He is board certified in both Canada and the United States of America to practice Optometry. He holds licenses in both Ontario and New York State where he fine-tuned his clinical skills for one year before returning back home.

Dr. Shaff has comprehensive knowledge and training in ocular disease detection and management and he is fully trained in prescribing therapeutics for eye conditions and diseases. He spent some time working at The Laser Center in London, Ontario and is able and qualified to perform consultation and pre- and post-operative care for patients with refractive laser eye surgery. He has also completed specialty training in Low Vision, Contact Lenses, and Pediatrics in his tenure.

Dr. Shaff’s passion is providing eye care to the underprivileged in areas all over the world. He has been to countries such as India, Thailand, Philippines, Tanzania, El Salvador, Mexico, and most recently Peru, to help the less fortunate.

In his continuing efforts to provide his patients with the most dedicated service and highest standard in eye care, Dr. Shaff wanted to move his location to Vision Source, with Dr. Jason Morris to provide full scope optometry. The visual needs and wellness of his patients has always been Dr. Shaff’s top priority. He is committed to honoring the trust you've placed in him and in our clinical facility.

Dr Morris' Vision Blog

  • Whitening eye drops poison to kids?
    June 15 - 17  |  I learned something today...  "Eyedrops get rid of bloodshot eyes but they can also be dangerous if your kid decides to squirt some in their mouth. 'Eyedrops that contain imidazoline decongestants such as naphazoline, tetrahydrozoline, or oxymetazoline are dangerous when ingested, even in small quantities like 1-2 tablespoons,' says Gwenn Christianson, RN at the Indiana Poison Center at IU Health. They can sedate children, and interfere with breathing. "

    Credit goes to: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/medical/warning-these-16-everyday-things-pose-huge-health-risks/ss-BBCEPFO?ocid=spartandhp#image=14

    Dr.j   www.studioeyecare.com

  • Skin Cancer & Sunglasses
    May 2017 | As Summer fast approaches it has me thinking about new sunglasses.  Everyone knows that protecting eyes from the harmful rays of the sun with good sunglasses is just as important as protecting your skin with good sunscreen.  However, did you know that sunglasses also protect  delicate eyelid tissue from UV?    Our eye lids are a common place for skin cancer because we never put sunscreen close to our eyes.   Wear sunglasses this summer to protect both your eye and lids!
    Dr j    StudioEyeCare.com

  • Why do we see spots after a camera flash?
    Feb 27, 2017  |  Great question from a young patient last week... "Why do I see spots after a bright light?"   To understand why, lets first talk about how the eye works.   When any light hits the back of the eye (retina) a chemical reaction occurs that converts the light energy into electrical/nerve energy that goes to the brain.  This reaction takes fuel that is constantly being produced by the eye and then used up - over and over again.   Under normal circumstances the fuel's speed-of-creation can keep up with the fuel's speed-of-use.  However, when the eye is presented with intense brightness like a camera flash (or eye exam!), the fuel is used up much faster than production.   Because there is no/low fuel after the flash, this flashed zone of the retina appears dark because there is no creation of the electrical/nervous energy until the fuel regenerates.    dr.j     Studioeyecare.com


  • Eyelash Extension Issues
    Feb 6, 2017 | With the explosion in the use of eyelash extension, there has certainly been associated issues coming through our clinic door.  #1 is ocular surface irritation [likely] from adhesives.  Please come in for assessment if your eyes have not felt 'right' since extensions.  Here is a good article from the Canadian Assoc of Optometrists... https://opto.ca/health-library/eyelash-extensions   Dr. j  Studioeyecare.com