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Dr. Shaffin Gulamhusein or “Shaff” as he’s known to his patients has been practicing optometry in London, Ontario since 2001. He graduated with Bachelor of Science degree in Human Biology from the University of Toronto in 1996 and received his Doctor of Optometry from The New England College of Optometry, Boston Massachusetts in 2000. As part of his extensive clinical training, he spent time at Aran Eye Associates Ophthalmology Group in Miami, Florida and The Brooke Army Medical Centre in San Antonio, Texas. He is board certified in both Canada and the United States of America to practice Optometry. He holds licenses in both Ontario and New York State where he fine-tuned his clinical skills for one year before returning back home.

Dr. Shaff has comprehensive knowledge and training in ocular disease detection and management and he is fully trained in prescribing therapeutics for eye conditions and diseases. He spent some time working at The Laser Center in London, Ontario and is able and qualified to perform consultation and pre- and post-operative care for patients with refractive laser eye surgery. He has also completed specialty training in Low Vision, Contact Lenses, and Pediatrics in his tenure.

Dr. Shaff’s passion is providing eye care to the underprivileged in areas all over the world. He has been to countries such as India, Thailand, Philippines, Tanzania, El Salvador, Mexico, and most recently Peru, to help the less fortunate.

In his continuing efforts to provide his patients with the most dedicated service and highest standard in eye care, Dr. Shaff wanted to move his location to Vision Source, with Dr. Jason Morris to provide full scope optometry. The visual needs and wellness of his patients has always been Dr. Shaff’s top priority. He is committed to honoring the trust you've placed in him and in our clinical facility.

WHAT OHIP COVERS
  • basic annual eye exams for seniors (65 and over) and children (19 and younger)
  • basic annual eye exams for individuals 20-64 with serious eye conditions or diabetes
  • basic annual eye exams for individuals on certain medications with ocular side effects
  • for those covered above, unlimited partial eye exams throughout the year

WHAT OHIP DOES NOT COVER
  • fitting of contact lenses or the ongoing monitoring of contact lens wearers
  • photo documentation
  • OCT imaging of retina
  • many tests associated with the diagnosis of glaucoma
  • visual field testing unless there has been a diagnosis of glaucoma or visual field loss needing monitoring
  • red eye / eye infection unless there is a corneal ulcer
  • any testing related to MTO/driver’s licenses
  • any testing or follow-up related to LASIK or corneal crosslinking eye surgery


These are the general rules.  There are many special cases where OHIP (or another government agency e.g. Veterans or Indian Affairs) may still cover the exam fee.   Please chat below or call us at 519-681-3670 to verify.



Free Eye Chart From Vision Source London

Click Here to Download Your Free Eye Chart

Searching for a free eye chart to check your vision at home?

Simply click on the image above, and your download will begin. You can use this eye chart to check your entire family's vision.

Remember: This is not a substitute for a complete medical eye exam by a licensed optometrist. But it could help you identify potential vision problems that demand professional attention.

How to Use the Eye Chart

  1. Print the free eye chart on regular 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper
  2. Tack or tape the chart to a windowless wall in a well-lit room at eye level
  3. Measure ten feet from the wall
  4. Cover one eye (if you wear glasses for distance vision, keep them on)
  5. Have another person point to each line as you read the letters out loud and keep track of which letters you get right
  6. Continue to the bottom row or until you can no longer read the letters
  7. Write down the number of the smallest line where you identified the majority of letters correctly (Ex./ If you were able to read 5 out of 8 letters on line 8, you would write 20/20.)
  8. Cover the other eye and repeat steps 5-7

What Do the Results Mean?

That depends on the age of the person being tested. A 3 to 4-year-old should be able to read the 20/40 line, and a 5-year-old the 20/30 line. Older children and adults should be able to read the majority of letters on the 20/20 line.

If you notice any results that fall outside these standards, be sure to schedule an eye exam with us!   519-681-3670




March 5 - 16 | At some point... you or a family member has likely had pink eye.  There are many causes but pink eye caused by a virus is the most common.  Like a cold, a viral red eye has typically not been treated in the past.  The 1-2 weeks of red, irritated eyes (and social isolation!) seems endless.

There are two new treatments for viral red eye that we are now using (when appropriate) so that you get better faster!  Povidone Iodine is an in office treatment to sterilize the eye of all virus so the the eye can heal faster.  We also use a new at home therapy to accelerate your return to white eyes!

Come in an talk to us today as we provide urgent eye care services.    519-681-3670 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with an appointment request - no referral required.

Depending on your diagnosis and your age, some services may not be OHIP covered.


Dr Morris' Vision Blog

  • Eye Make-Up Trend and Stys
    Aug 2017 | There is a make-up trend that giving me business... in a bad way.  The popular look to paint lid margins is giving young women sore, irritated eyes and eye lids.  In the image below you can see the trend to paint lid margin (the strip of lid tissue between the lashes and the eye ball).  The problem is that there are openings to small glands (meibomian) on this strip that become clogged with makeup causing lid inflammation (sore), stys (infections) and irritated eyes (dry eye).  I know that an old Optometrist is not going to change teenagers' make-up styles!... but just be aware to [1] not use if you can [2] try to make sure that this area is cleaned properly after use [3] see an Optometrist if you have any of the symptoms listed above asap!      Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com


  • Blinding Eye Tattoos
    July 2017 |  Re-posted information > credit to author below   Dr.j   StudioEyeCare.com

    Getting an Eye Tattoo Can Blind You

    You may have heard about a new frontier in tattooing: eyeball tattoos. A quick internet search will turn up dozens of photos (some real, some fake) of people with black, blue or multi-colored eyes. But just because some people have gotten away with it, don’t assume it’s safe—or a good idea. Your ophthalmologist says the risks aren’t worth it.

    Paul Freund, MD, and Mark Greve, MD, from the University of Alberta in Canada recently reported on a tragic case. A 24-year-old man underwent an eyeball tattoo procedure and experienced a sudden, painful loss of vision while the tattoo artist was injecting ink into the first eye.

    For eye tattoos, the tattooist injects ink just under the surface of the conjunctiva, so it colors the sclera – the white part of the eye. In this case, the ink had been injected too deep, into the vitreous humor in the middle of the eye.

    The patient sought treatment three days after the tattoo procedure. Drs. Freund and Greve removed the vitreous and the lens of the eye. The lens had been damaged by the needle during the tattoo procedure. The doctors discovered that the mixture of vitreous and tattoo ink was contaminated with bacteria. Two surgeries and multiple procedures to deliver antibiotics were done to try to control the infection and complications from the tattoo procedure.

    Eventually, the entire eye had to be removed because the young man was in so much pain. After the eye was removed, the retina and inside of the eye were found to be stained with ink. There was also cell loss on the corneal epithelium—which keeps the cornea healthy. Even if the eye had been saved, the patient would have had serious vision problems.

    Eyeball tattoos have serious risks and have not been medically or scientifically studied. Because they are not a traditional part of tattooing, artists who are doing eyeball tattoos may not be properly trained. Risks of eyeball tattoos include:

    Decreased vision or complete blindness
    Infection from the injection or ink
    Potential loss of the eye
    Sensitivity to light
    Feeling like something is in your eye


    Written by: Dan Gudgel
    Reviewed by: Paul R Freund, MD
  • First Sunglasses from Canada?
    July 2017 | My daughter had a recent visit to the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto and found this interesting trivia for me...  The first sunglasses / snow goggles to protect eyes from damaging UV rays from the sun came from Canadian Inuit...  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_goggles    Happy 150 Canada   Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com

  • U2's Bono and Glaucoma
    July 2017 | In honor of U2 playing in Dublin this weekend I am pasting great 2015 information from the American Academy of Ophthalmology...  (Although in Canada Optometrists treat glaucoma too!)

    4 Things You can Learn About Glaucoma from Bono
    Written by: Linda Apeles
     
     Jan. 09, 2015
    One of the biggest glaucoma-related news stories of 2014 was Bono's revelation that he has the condition. While his comments about it have been brief, there are important tips the public can learn about glaucoma following the rockstar's announcement.

    1. Having glaucoma doesn't mean you have to go blind.

    When Bono announced he had glaucoma, he revealed that he has had the condition for many years. He serves as a great example of how many people with glaucoma can keep their sight and still lead very active lives if treated early enough. In fact, the probability of blindness due to glaucoma has decreased by nearly half since 1980. Researchers believe that advances in diagnosis and therapy are likely causes for the decrease.

    2. Glaucoma treatments work!

    It's no wonder the public never suspected that Bono had an eye disease – that's how effective glaucoma treatments, such as medicated eye drops and minimally invasive surgery, can be. "I have good treatments and I am going to be fine," Bono said at the time of the announcement.

    3. The earlier you get diagnosed, the better.

    The key to preventing vision loss from glaucoma is early diagnosis. While the details of his treatment have not been shared with the public, 54 year-old Bono said he has had the disease for over 20 years, so it's likely he was diagnosed at an early stage. Blindness from glaucoma can often be prevented with early treatment.

    4. Glaucoma may have no obvious symptoms in its early stages.

    As you get older, it is especially important to have regular medical eye exams. The only sure way to diagnose glaucoma is with a complete eye exam. A screening that only checks eye pressure is not enough to find glaucoma. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that all adults (even if they have no signs of symptoms of eye problems) get a baseline eye examination at least by age 40, the time when early signs of disease or changes in vision may occur. A baseline exam can help identify signs of eye disease at an early stage when many treatments can have the greatest impact on preserving vision. Of course, if you have any problems with your vision or eye comfort before age 40, don't wait; make an appointment with an ophthalmologist right away.